CT_CHARADD

 CHARADD()
 Adds the corresponding ASCII codes of two strings

 Syntax

     CHARADD(<cString1>,<cString2>) --> cString

 Arguments

     <cString1>  [@]  Designates the character string to which values
     from a second character string <cString2> are added.

     <cString2>  Designates the character string that is added, character
     for character, to <cString1>.

 Returns

     The processed character string is returned.

 Description

     You can use CHARADD() to produce simple character string coding.  The
     function can prove very useful when processes are coded by individual
     characters in a string.

 Notes

     .  When both character strings are the same length, then the
        first byte of <cString1> can be linked with the first byte of
        <cString2>, and the second byte of <cString1> can be linked with the
        second byte of <cString2>, and so on.  If <cString2> is shorter than
        <cString1>, then as soon as the last byte of <cString2> is reached,
        the process continues and starts again with the first byte of
        <cString2>.  However, if <cString1> is shorter than <cString2>, the
        process terminates with the end of <cString1>.

     .  Values greater than 256 can result when adding values.  The
        new value is then formed based on the following formula:

           (ASC(Character1) + ASC(Character2))% 256.

     .  Implementing CSETREF() can suppress the return value for this
        function to save room in working memory.

 Examples

     .  Add a value of 1 to each character:

        ? CHARADD("01234", CHR(1))        // "12345"

     .  Adding a value of 255 to each character corresponds to
        subtracting 1:

        ? CHARADD("12345", CHR(255))      // "01234"

See Also: ADDASCII() CSETREF() Introduction



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